All posts by Rachel Mackintosh

Gender and Economic Equality for Women in New Zealand: Progress and Challenges

Gender and Economic Equality for Women in New Zealand: Progress and Challenges

The Human Rights Commission in partnership with the National Council of Women, Pacific Women’s Watch, Māori Women’s Welfare League and Business & Professional Women are hosting a panel to discuss “Gender and Economic Equality for Women in New Zealand: Progress and Challenges”.

Posted by New Zealand Human Rights Commission on Monday, 9 March 2020

Following on from her talk – What are we waiting for? — the pitfalls of respectability – to us on International Women’s day 8th March, Rachel Mackintosh was part of this panel discussion hosted by the Human Rights Commission, held on Tuesday 10th March.

Gender and Economic Equality for Women in New Zealand: Progress and Challenges was chaired by the Right Honourable Helen Clark, former prime Minister of New Zealand, and featured panellists:

  • Saunoamaali’i Karanina Sumeo, Equal Employment Opportunities Commissioner
  • Prue Kapua, President of the Māori Women’s Welfare League
  • Lisa Lawrence, National President National Council of Women
  • Rachel Mackintosh, Council of Trade Unions
  • Rebecca Barnes-Clark, Ministry for Women

What are we waiting for? — the pitfalls of respectability

with Rachel Mackintosh

What are we waiting for? — the pitfalls of respectability
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Rachel Mackintosh © 8 March 2020

The seeds of International Women’s day were sown the year my grandmother was born. In 1908, 15,000 women marched through New York City demanding shorter working hours, better pay and the right to vote. It was the Socialist Party of America who declared the first (US) national women’s day a year later.

The idea to make the day international came in 1910, at an international socialist conference of working women in Copenhagen. An attendee called Clara Zetkin suggested it and the100 women present from 17 countries unanimously agreed. The first international celebration was in 1911, in Austria, Germany, Denmark and Switzerland.

Continue reading What are we waiting for? — the pitfalls of respectability

I am a man

With Rachel Mackintosh

I am a man
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Rachel Mackintosh © 22 September 2019

When I was 17 I wrote a 500-word essay in English on this quote from King Lear: “I am a man more sinned against than sinning.”

Just to recap in case you have forgotten or never knew, King Lear was on a heath in a storm, having been thrown out by his daughters Goneril and Regan, even though he had given them half his kingdom each and was expecting to live with them in his old age. He had been proud, arrogant and pretty irritating. They had been venal and unloving.

Continue reading I am a man

From Samuel Parnell to the future: working  in union

with Rachel Mackintosh

Service Leader: Clay Nelson

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The Eight Hour Day is by Australian singer, songwriter, poet, John Warner, and is sung here with Margaret Walters.

Bread and Roses originated from a speech given by U.S. laabour union leader Rose Schneiderman; a line in that speech “The worker must have bread, but she must have roses, too.” (appealing for both fair wages and dignified conditions) inspired the title of the poem Bread and Roses by James Oppenheim. It is now most often sung to the tune by Mimi Fariña popularised by her sister Joan Baez.

Rachel Mackintosh © 21st October 2018

I mostly avoided history at school. Too much reading. I like reading. Modern poetry. Shortish novels. Brevity is the soul of wit. History had great heavy tomes. So when Clay asked me to speak on Labour Weekend, I thought, “Labour Day. Hmmmm. Samuel Parnell. What exactly?” I do believe in considering how the past has got us to here, but I’m often hazy on the details. Thank goodness for the New Zealand Dictionary of Biography. And Google. And before Google, thank goodness for the index. So I invite you to join me on a journey out of the haze. Continue reading From Samuel Parnell to the future: working  in union

Human rights. Whose rights? Our rights!

with Rachel Mackintosh

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Rachel Mackintosh © 1 July 2018

E nga mana, e nga reo, e nga rangatira ma, tena koutou.
E te whare e tu ake nei, tena koe
E te whanau o Auckland Unitarians,
E nga manuhiri, tena koutou, tena koutou, tena koutou
Ko tangata tiriti te iwi
Ko E tu, Ko te Kauae kaimahi nga uniana
No Tamaki Makaurau ahau
Ko Rachel Mackintosh toku ingoa
No reira
Tena koutou
Tena koutou
Tena tatou katoa

“Rape culture is a culture where we normalise sexual violence. We see this on a continuum – from rape jokes, ‘locker room banter’ and victim blaming, through to catcalling, non-consensual sexual photos, to sexual coercion and rape.” These are the words of Gill Greer, CEO of the National Council of Women. Continue reading Human rights. Whose rights? Our rights!