Welcome!

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auckland unitarian church, auckland unitarian church, unitarian universalists, new zealand, UU, auckland historyThe Auckland Unitarian Church is an open, progressive and welcoming faith community. We walk diverse spiritual paths to find purpose and meaning in our lives, but we are united in our belief in the inherent worth and dignity of every person.

Whatever your spiritual journey, you are welcome here.

We welcomed Rev. Clay Nelson in September 2014 as our new minister. Some Sunday sermons are still delivered by members and guest speakers.

Our regular Sunday Services start at 10.30am. Additionally, Continue reading Welcome!

Celebrating Human Rights: Freedom from Religion

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David Hines

David is a member of Auckland Unitarian Church, and also Public relations officer for the Secular Education Network.

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David Hines © 4 December 2016

Secular education – the battle behind the scenes

Good morning. I’d like to thank you all and Clay Nelson especially for inviting me to speak about human rights, and how it affects our state schools. Continue reading Celebrating Human Rights: Freedom from Religion

What does the Treaty of Waitangi mean for ourselves and our church?

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Christine Herzog

Treaty Educator, Treaty Resource Centre – He Puna Mātauranga o Te Tiriti

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Opening Words are Race relations by Glenn Colquhoun.

Christine Herzog © 27 November 2016

A Brave and Startling Truth: Solidarity after Helen Kelly

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Rachel Mackintosh

Vice-president, New Zealand Council of Trade Unions – Te Kauae Kaimahi,
National Director of Organising Etū, New Zealand’s largest private sector union.

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Opening Words are Kindness by Naomi Shihab Nye.

Peace and Social Justice Group,  Article in Quest re Samoan Dyslexia Project (scroll to P4).

Rachel Mackintosh © 20 November 2016

“Nothing wondrous can come in this world unless it rests on the shoulders of kindness.”

This is a quote from the Barbara Kingsolver novel, The Lacuna. The context is Leon Trotsky’s last day, in Mexico City, where he was living in exile, studying, writing and being part of a local community. Continue reading A Brave and Startling Truth: Solidarity after Helen Kelly