Art on a spiritual theme…

One-day-only exhibition: Saturday 6th July, 12.00 noon to 4.00pm.

Come along to peruse, purchase, create, hear a talk, participate in discussion.

Our exhibition will feature a variety of artists with different influences and views. The common theme is spirituality. Join us to see how many ways art can be spiritual.

At 2.00pm there will be a talk by Lynn Farhi, the exhibition’s originator, on spirituality in her art.

We will also have a felting workshop – create a brooch with your chosen spiritual symbol.

Some works will be for sale and some just for looking.

See you there.

Is racism curable?

with Rev. Clay Nelson.

Is racism curable?
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Clay Nelson © 26 May 2019

The answer to whether or not racism is curable is “maybe”. Scientists are working on it, but they aren’t there yet. But they do know a few prerequisites. Racism is what Rudyard Kipling coined as “the white man’s burden.” Not just for Trump supporters and people who dress up in bedsheets but all white people, even for Unitarians in their predominantly white faith movement with their first three principles which are the antidote to racism.

If you’re white you are subject to white consciousness, what Unitarian Charles Alexander describes as moderate white supremacy. “Moderate White Supremacy is systemic, invasive, and self-perpetuating, continually prioritising White cultural values and interests above those of marginalised people of colour. It permeates and corrupts our practices, systems and institutions, even corrupting the reforms we institute to bring about equality.” As a black man Alexander points out that it is the white people’s burden to cure themselves.

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When did immigration become a bad word?

with Rev. Clay Nelson

When did immigration become a bad word?
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Clay Nelson © 19 May 2019

From NZ History Online

A meeting in Dunedin presided over by the mayor unanimously called for a ban on further Chinese migrants.

New Zealand in the 19th century strived to be a ‘Britain of the South Seas’ and Pākehā saw non-white migrants as undesirable. The discovery of gold in California, Canada, Australia and later New Zealand attracted many Chinese men wanting to make their fortunes before returning home.

In the 1860s the Dunedin Chamber of Commerce sought to replace European miners who had left Otago for the new West Coast fields. Chinese were seen as hard-working and law-abiding, and they were also willing to rework abandoned claims. The first 12 men arrived from Victoria in 1866; 2000 more had followed by late 1869. Chinese women seldom migrated to New Zealand. In 1881 there were only nine women to 4995 men, raising fears that white women were at risk from Chinese men.

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The need for identity

with Rev. Clay Nelson

The need for identity
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Clay Nelson © 12 May 2019

When the man stopped for the amber light as he legally should instead of gunning through the intersection trying to beat the red light, the woman behind him laid on her horn, opened her window screaming abuse at him while giving him the universal finger of outrage for preventing her from running the light. While waiting for the light to change there was a knock at her window. It was a constable inviting her out of the car. He put her under arrest. At the station she was finger-printed and put in a holding cell.

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